Lifestyle

Soul Board – the somewhat different Vision Board

22. February 2018
Dieser Beitrag ist auch verfügbar in: Deutsch
vision-board-soul-board

My first vision board was made with images of Biene Maja and Willi – German children’s cartoon characters – and I remember it well. What I can’t recall is why I chose those particular images – maybe to articulate my wish for unlimited TV time, who knows?

I create a few vision boards every year and have started calling them ‘soul boards’ instead – it warms my heart a bit more. I renew my soul board about every quarter of a year and have lots of fun in the process. It helps me to track my progress and see how I am developing.

What a vision board should represent

It’s always interesting to see how, at the beginning of the year, we’re busily trying to realize our new year’s resolutions and then, three weeks in, throwing the towel and giving up entirely. We might do well to remember that unpleasant habits which have developed and calcified over years likely won’t dissolve in such a short time.

vision-board-soul-board

It’s also not easy to develop new habits. The first few days may be flooded with short term enthusiasm, but in the long run it takes patience and perseverance and a solid WHY to manifest new patterns.

It’s extremely smart to question why we want something new. If the reason lacks substance, it won’t take long for the resolution to dissolve into thin air.

A soul board should represent one or more feelings which I can work to connect to my resolution or plan. I can ask myself then which feelings come to mind when I think of my intention?

When you look at your finished soul board, these feelings should be immediately visible to you, more so than the potential stress we might feel when being reminded of our goals for the year. We’re much more likely to channel our energy towards something that triggers feelings of freedom, lightness, plenty, health, or love, right?

vision-board-soul-board

How to create your own soul board

  1. For your vision board with a good dose of positive vibes you’ll collect a stack of magazines and newspapers – you might ask friends and neighbors to donate their old ones. Then you’ll need a large sheet of some thick craft paper or similar as a background – check at McPaper or similar shops. You’ll need scissors and glue as well.
  2. Take some time to first write down your wishes and intentions for the months ahead. How do you want to live? How do you want to feel? What do you need to make that happen? Then ask yourself why you want these things. Your ‘why’ should give you goosebumps. Dare to dream and reach high!
  3. Put on your favorite music – the tunes that make you feel good.
  4. Take a few minutes just to look at your blank background – let the emptiness work its magic.
  5. Then begin leafing through the magazines and tear or cut out anything that represents aspects of your intentions for the months ahead. Stay intuitive, out of your head. The images don’t have to be directly related to your plans, but rather to the underlying feeling, to the ‘why.’ I prefer ripping and tearing to cutting.
  6. Remember that it’s your vision board! You’re making it for yourself and no one else. Be authentic.
  7. Once you’ve collected a sheaf of images begin laying these out loosely on your background, arranging and rearranging until you’re happy with the outcome.
  8. When you’re finished arranging, snap a picture with your phone (or whatever you use), so that you can remember the order you discovered. Then begin gluing. Let your finished product dry completely and hang it on a wall in a space where you spend lots of time, so that the board can work its magic, reminding you of your ‘why’ and most of all to keep at it!

Have fun crafting! The cover image above can be used as a cellphone background – you can download it here.

Yours truly,

Madhavi

Stay-true-wie-du-deine-wahrheit-lebst-buch-madhavi-guemoes

Madhavi Guemoes
At the age of 15, Madhavi Guemoes thought that she understood life completely, only to realize 25 years later that this is impossible. She is a freelance writer and full-time blogger in Berlin and the mother of two children. When she’s not pounding the keys, she’s trying to stand on her head. Madhavi has been practicing Yoga for over 25 years – which actually doesn’t mean anything.
Madhavi Guemoes on EmailMadhavi Guemoes on FacebookMadhavi Guemoes on InstagramMadhavi Guemoes on PinterestMadhavi Guemoes on Twitter